Teen Spends 1.6 Million On PUBG Without His Parents Knowing

Jul 06, 2020 Games

Teen Spends 1.6 Million On PUBG Without His Parents Knowing

Amidst the recent PUBG ban in Pakistan, we have been around a lot of controversy, arguments and debate within the society. There is one side of the people who say it’s good that the game was banned because it instilled violence and negative thoughts inside the heads of young children; whereas the other side revolted against the decision, saying the game has nothing to do with it and parents themselves should keep a check on their kids. Whatever the case may be, one thing’s for certain and it’s that some gamers are way too indulged in games like PUBG, and are willing to go to extremes to get what they want.

That’s the story for one such gamer from India, who reportedly spent over 1.6 million, or 16 lac rupees on PUBG mobile to buy different character skins and gun skins inside the game. The player was a 17 year old boy, who was using his parent’s money from 3 different accounts to make in-app purchases for his PUBG account. He would use his mother’s mobile to play PUBG as he lied about him studying on the phone instead, and would delete all the notification messages from the bank about the transactions made inside the game. The kid would also shuffle the money between the three bank accounts so no one would get suspicious about their child’s activities.

After the report was carried out, it was found that his father was a government official who said he was trying to save his money for his child’s education in the future. 16 lacs can pay off an entire bachelor’s degree, and more depending on the college selection. These sort of incidents aren’t the fault of PUBG or the game, it’s the fault of parents and their upbringing and monitoring of their children, who take advantage of the lack of attention their parents give them. We urge parents to look after their offspring and make sure their kids aren’t doing anything they aren’t supposed to be doing.



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